Julissa + Christopher’s Vintage-Inspired Champagne Foil Wedding Invitations

So we’re all pretty familiar with shiny gold foil by now, yes? But what about matte metallic foils – like the subtle champagne foil on these vintage-inspired wedding invitations from Nicole at Umama? Nicole worked with the talented team at Boxcar Press to print these invitations, pairing the subtle matte metallic foil with crisp black and white. Such a great combination!

Vintage Inspired Matte Metallic Foil Wedding Invitations Umama Boxcar Press OSBP Julissa + Christophers Vintage Inspired Champagne Foil Wedding Invitations

From NicoleI wanted to create a pattern that would combine romance and elegance and could be used throughout the wedding invitation suite. I went with a classic deco scallop for the invitation and a set of nestled peacocks that repeated from the reply card to the envelope liner.

Vintage Inspired Matte Metallic Foil Wedding Invitations Umama Boxcar Press OSBP7 Julissa + Christophers Vintage Inspired Champagne Foil Wedding Invitations

While reviewing swatches from Boxcar Press, we absolutely fell in love with the tawny foil. It was more subtle than the gold foil, and really lent itself to the softness that Julissa was looking for. It mimics the color of champagne, and brings to mind the decadence of the evening, and the cause for celebration.

Vintage Inspired Matte Metallic Foil Wedding Invitations Umama Boxcar Press OSBP13 Julissa + Christophers Vintage Inspired Champagne Foil Wedding Invitations

Vintage Inspired Matte Metallic Foil Wedding Invitations Umama Boxcar Press OSBP6 Julissa + Christophers Vintage Inspired Champagne Foil Wedding InvitationsVintage Inspired Matte Metallic Foil Wedding Invitations Umama Boxcar Press OSBP5 Julissa + Christophers Vintage Inspired Champagne Foil Wedding Invitations

The invitation suite was printed on Crane Lettra 220 Pearl White paper with tawny foil and black letterpress. A coordinating liner was also custom designed and printed in two shades of black. Mary from Boxcar Press was the keen eye that helped to pull all the details together seamlessly from design to print. The end result was breathtaking!

Vintage Inspired Matte Metallic Foil Wedding Invitations Umama Boxcar Press OSBP3 Julissa + Christophers Vintage Inspired Champagne Foil Wedding Invitations

Vintage Inspired Matte Metallic Foil Wedding Invitations Umama Boxcar Press OSBP10 Julissa + Christophers Vintage Inspired Champagne Foil Wedding Invitations

Vintage Inspired Matte Metallic Foil Wedding Invitations Umama Boxcar Press OSBP11 Julissa + Christophers Vintage Inspired Champagne Foil Wedding Invitations

Vintage Inspired Matte Metallic Foil Wedding Invitations Umama Boxcar Press OSBP8 Julissa + Christophers Vintage Inspired Champagne Foil Wedding Invitations

Thanks Nicole!

Design: Umama

Letterpress and Foil Printing: Boxcar Press

Check out the Designer Rolodex for more tal­ented wed­ding invi­ta­tion design­ers and the real invi­ta­tions gallery for more wedding invitation ideas!

Photo Credits: Umama

 

Things to Party With: Copper + Indigo

Things to Party With Vol1 Copper Indigo OSBP Things to Party With: Copper + Indigo

1. Love this screen printed blue linen tablecloth from Bonnie and Neil

2. The perfect modern copper pitcher from Terrain

3. White dinnerware from Pigeon Toe Ceramics is the perfect complement for copper and indigo

4. Copper and white bud vases from Honeycomb Studio for a beautiful but low-key centerpiece

5. Gorgeous texture in this cheeseboard from Suite One Studio

6. Don’t have a bar cart at home? Set this copper tray from West Elm on a console table and you’re good to go!

7. Punch is the perfect drink for large gatherings. Try our Fall Harvest Punch in this punch set from Terrain

Alison + Nathaniel’s Art Nouveau Garden Wedding Invitations

These beautiful wedding invitations from Brynne at Harken Press mix botanical details with Art Nouveau elements for a garden wedding at a private estate. I’m particularly in love with that gorgeous envelope liner and pops of coral!

Art Nouveau Garden Wedding Invitations Harken Press OSBP Alison + Nathaniels Art Nouveau Garden Wedding Invitations

From BrynneI worked with Alison and Nathaniel to create wedding stationery that complements their charming garden ceremony at a private estate in Topsfield, Massachusetts. They wanted to include outdoors elements but also highlight the cottage-style architecture of the historic mansion estate. My goal was to balance the natural and rustic botanical elements with an elegant Art Nouveau look.

Art Nouveau Garden Wedding Invitations Harken Press OSBP2 Alison + Nathaniels Art Nouveau Garden Wedding Invitations

Art Nouveau Garden Wedding Invitations Harken Press OSBP3 Alison + Nathaniels Art Nouveau Garden Wedding Invitations

The invitation and reply card were letterpress printed, while the guest info card with hand drawn map on the backside were digital printed.

Art Nouveau Garden Wedding Invitations Harken Press OSBP5 Alison + Nathaniels Art Nouveau Garden Wedding Invitations

Art Nouveau Garden Wedding Invitations Harken Press OSBP4 Alison + Nathaniels Art Nouveau Garden Wedding Invitations

Thanks Brynne!

Check out the Designer Rolodex for more tal­ented wed­ding invi­ta­tion design­ers and the real invi­ta­tions gallery for more wedding invitation ideas!

Photo Credits: Harken Press

Zoë’s Hand Lettered First Birthday Party Invitations

Happy Monday everyone! I couldn’t resist starting the week with these bright and happy first birthday party invitations from Viv Jordan of The Eclectic Press. Viv knew she wanted something on the non-traditional side, incorporating her own hand lettering throughout the invitation along with illustrations of birthday candles and doughnuts. So fun!

Hand Lettered First Birthday Party Invitations The Eclectic Press OSBP Zoës Hand Lettered First Birthday Party Invitations

From Viv: I wasn’t able to create an announcement for my sweet daughter’s birth last year, so I wanted to pour my energy and creativity into making something fun and unique for her first birthday. While drawing out some sketches, I knew I wanted to create something a little less conventional, so I decided to hand letter and illustrate the design for Zoë’s first birthday invitation and coordinating pieces.

Hand Lettered First Birthday Party Invitations The Eclectic Press OSBP5 Zoës Hand Lettered First Birthday Party Invitations

I incorporated birthday candles in the design and I also included doughnuts because my husband and I are obsessed with doughnuts and wanted that to be our daughter’s first bite of sugar instead of a smash cake.

Hand Lettered First Birthday Party Invitations The Eclectic Press OSBP2 Zoës Hand Lettered First Birthday Party Invitations

Other coordinating pieces included an 11×17″ welcome sign, some small place cards used for signage and food labels, three sticker designs for kiddos and parents to wear and a party favor bookmark with a much loved quote about reading.

Hand Lettered First Birthday Party Invitations The Eclectic Press OSBP7 Zoës Hand Lettered First Birthday Party Invitations

Hand Lettered First Birthday Party Invitations The Eclectic Press OSBP6 Zoës Hand Lettered First Birthday Party Invitations

Hand Lettered First Birthday Party Invitations The Eclectic Press OSBP4 Zoës Hand Lettered First Birthday Party Invitations

Hand Lettered First Birthday Party Invitations The Eclectic Press OSBP9 Zoës Hand Lettered First Birthday Party Invitations

Hand Lettered First Birthday Party Invitations The Eclectic Press OSBP10 Zoës Hand Lettered First Birthday Party Invitations

Hand Lettered First Birthday Party The Eclectic Press OSBP Zoës Hand Lettered First Birthday Party Invitations

Hand Lettered First Birthday Party The Eclectic Press OSBP2 Zoës Hand Lettered First Birthday Party Invitations

Thanks Viv!

Photo Credits: Invitation photos by Heather Hawkins / Party Photos by Lemons and Tea Photography

Friday Happy Hour: How to Choose Cocktail Glasses

The most frequent comment we receive on our cocktail posts is this: where do we get those beautiful cocktail glasses? It’s a good question: the perfect drink deserves the perfect glass. You’re not going to ruin a delicious drink by using the wrong glass, but using the right glass can definitely enhance your experience. The good news is, we’re starting our own Etsy shop, Liquorary, to share some our best finds from over our years of cocktail posts. We’ve scoured antique stores and shows, thrift shops, estate sales, and flea markets. We’ve searched forgotten dusty corners and overlooked shelves for our cocktail glasses. We’ve found classic coupes and flutes, midcentury highballs, and a load of other gorgeous glasses that are perfect for your next drink.

So if you’re going to put care into making a recipe, whether it’s a classic or own of ours or own of your own, then it’s worth putting some care into your glassware.

How to Choose Cocktail Glassware Illustration Jillian Pulford OSBP5 Friday Happy Hour: How to Choose Cocktail Glasses

Illustration by Jillian Evelyn / Hand Lettering by Maria Filar for Oh So Beautiful Paper

The Cocktail Glass

The modern cocktail glass is iconic: a slender stem, with a cone-shaped bowl and wide rim. Also known as the Martini glass, the modern cocktail glass is an Art Deco homage to the classic cocktail glass. And it’s a total disaster. It’s poorly balanced, and its shallow bowl and sharply angled sides are practically designed to slosh your drink all of you. And, with few exceptions, it’s way too big – so either you’re going to end up with a half-filled glass, or you’re going to mix a huge drink that’s way too big and will warm up before you can finish it. Instead, you want something like this: The Robert Frost Cocktail Recipe OSBP 6 Friday Happy Hour: How to Choose Cocktail Glasses

The Robert Frost

This is a vintage cocktail glass, the vintage shape our of which our modern Martini glasses evolved. Its sides are less shallow than a modern glass, making it harder to spill. Its flat-bottomed bowl gives it a better balance, leaving it harder to knock over. Its stem will keep your warm hand away from your drink. And its smaller size – just four to six ounces – is a perfect fit for most drinks. No super-sized, watered down and warmed up cocktails need apply. All-spirits drinks, like the Old Fashioned, the Martini, or the Manhattan, are perfect for the smaller end of that range, while many Sours will fit in the larger end. These aren’t easy to find these days. I’ve seen some from Libbey Glass that fit the bill, but your best bet is to go vintage. Antique stores and shows, yard and estate sales, and online auctions can be a pain to hunt through, but are your best bet for the best glassware.

Coupes

The coupe was first invented as a champagne glass in the late 1600s, but it’s actually pretty terrible at that job. It’s wide brim lets the champagne release all of its carbonation too quickly. But it probably didn’t take too long for anyone to figure out that the coupe has a much better role: serving cocktails. It plays pretty much the same role that the classic cocktail glass used to play: well balanced, easy to hold without spilling, and elegant.

OSBP Signature Cocktail Recipe Raised in a Red Barn 29 Friday Happy Hour: How to Choose Cocktail Glasses

Raised in a Red Barn

It’s much easier to find beautiful antique and vintage coupes, and there’s tremendous variety in shape, color, and design. There are also some modern coupes that are both beautiful and just the right size; check out Cocktail Kingdom‘s selection, especially their 3.75 and 6 oz sizes. Coupes are perfect for the same drinks as the classic cocktail glass, all-spirits drinks and Sours.

Flutes

OSBP Signature Cocktail Recipe The Brandy Crusta 24 Friday Happy Hour: How to Choose Cocktail Glasses

The Brandy Crusta

Unlike the coupe, the flute actually is pretty good for champagne. Its narrow bowl reduces the drink’s surface area and retains carbonation for longer. This makes the flute ideal for any drinks that incorporate Champagne or another carbonated ingredient, like the French 75. It’s also pretty useful for recipes with big garnishes, like the whole lemon peel in the Brandy Crusta. We’re still partial to vintage, but there’s a big array of new flutes available, so these should be easy to find. Aim for three to four ounces, and no more than six.

Lowballs

OSBP Signature Cocktail Recipe Sunset Mai Tai 27 Friday Happy Hour: How to Choose Cocktail Glasses

Sunset Mai Tai

Lowballs – also called Old Fashioneds, tumblers, and rocks glasses – are low glasses, with wide rims and heavy bottoms. As the name and shape suggest, they’re perfect for any drink that you build in the glass, layering and muddling ingredients, like the Old Fashioned, Caipirinha, or Smash. Like the flute, there are tons of good vintage and new versions available, and some pretty cool looking reproductions of classic designs, so these should be easy to find. Look for glasses between six and ten ounces.

Highballs

Cocktail Friday Gin Rickey 24 550x440 Friday Happy Hour: How to Choose Cocktail Glasses

The Gin Rickey

The highball is the Laurel to the Old Fashioned’s Hardy: tall and narrow, perfect for bigger drinks (also known as long drinks) built in the glass. At eight to twelve ounces, the highball is your go-to for drinks like the Mojito, the Cobbler, and the Rickey, drinks with lots of ice and muddled ingredients. (The Collins glass is slightly taller and narrower yet than the highball, but there’s quite a bit of overlap between the two styles so I tend to use the terms interchangeably.) As with the Old Fashioned, vintage designs are pretty easy to find, but there are also lots of new and reproductions available too these days.

Sherbets

Frozen Cocktail Party Inspiration Sweet Root Village OSBP 92 Friday Happy Hour: How to Choose Cocktail Glasses

Frozen St-Germain Daiquiri

Looking generally something like a stocky coupe, the sherbet glass is stemmed with a broad, deep bowl and thick glass sides. As the name suggests, the sherbet started life as a dessert glass for sherbets and ice cream. They’re plentiful at antique shows and flea markets, far more so than any proper cocktail glasses, though I can’t tell if that’s because a variety of large-bowled glassware is getting lumped together as “sherbets.” In any case, the more delicate of them can often serve as good stand-ins for coupes, and the larger are often perfect for frozen and Tiki drinks.

Punch Bowls

OSBP St Germain New Years Eve Cocktail Party Ideas Recipes 236 Friday Happy Hour: How to Choose Cocktail Glasses

Alliance Club Punch

I’m no expert – I’ve only made punch a few times, though always to great acclaim – but I do know you should look for big punch bowls (2-3 quarts should be enough for spirits, citrus, and ice) and tiny punch glasses (2-3 ounces should do it). The idea is to encourage your guests to make lots of trips to the punch bowl to refill their glasses, making the punch bowl a center of interaction.

The List Goes On

I’m already over a thousand words and I feel like I’ve barely scratched the surface. Mugs for Moscow Mules and Blue Blazers? Cordials? Hurricane glasses? There’s still a huge array of glasses, especially specialty glasses for individual drinks, that we haven’t even talked about at all. And that’s ok. It’s easy to fall down the rabbit hole of glassware when you don’t need to. Yes, the Hurricane is named after a glass that looks just like a hurricane lamp. And you know what? A Hurricane served in a highball or a sherbet glass will taste just as good. Looking for the exact glass for every drink can leave you with overflowing cabinets and an empty wallet. Now, if someone wanted to get you some niche glasses as a gift, I’m not saying to turn them down…

Photo Credits: Frozen St-Germain Daiquiri by Sweet Root Village / all others by Nole Garey for Oh So Beautiful Paper