Georgie + Dave’s Nature-Inspired Wedding Invitations

Happy Monday everyone!  I love starting the week with a gorgeous set of wedding invitations, and today is no exception.  These invitations come to us from Amy of Saint Gertrude Design and Letterpress in Melbourne, Australia.  Amy combined a laser-cut tree overlay with two-color letterpress printed wedding invitations to achieve a modern, yet rustic, aesthetic for these wonderful invitations.

From AmyGeorgie and Dave’s wedding invitation suite was quite an epic project, merging two-colour letterpress print with an intricate laser cut folder.  This couple may be Melbourne cityfolk, but their attitudes and values were just so beautifully down-to-earth that I felt a simple but rustic vibe was needed for their invitations.

They were married under a canopy of trees at The Boulevard in Kew and rather than just paying lip service to this, an intricately illustrated tree was laser-cut to create a silhouette over the letterpress printed invitations underneath.  A heart cut into its trunk aligned perfectly with the couple’s heart monogram below and this motif ran throughout all of their stationery.  The whole suite was tied up in cotton string with a gift tag.

 

 

Beautiful!  Thanks Amy!

Check out the Designer Rolodex for more tal­ented wed­ding invi­ta­tion design­ers and the real invi­ta­tions gallery for more wedding invitation ideas!

Photo Credits: Structured Pieces

Friday Happy Hour: The Traditional Margarita

With spring just around the corner, it seemed appropriate to share a recipe for one of the most popular spring and summer cocktails – although the key ingredient might also be among the most misunderstood in American cocktails.  Along with its close relative the Daiquiri, there are few drinks as abused in American drinking culture as the Margarita.  I’m sure there are plenty of bars that serve great, authentic Margaritas, but the sickly sweet, blended drink that most people experience is a pale shadow of this classic drink.

Signature Cocktail Recipe: The Traditional Margarita via Oh So Beautiful Paper (6)

Read below for the full recipe!

The Margarita

2 oz Tequila
1 oz Cointreau
3/4 oz Lime Juice
3/4 oz Lemon Juice
1 Dash Agave Nectar or Simple Syrup

Combine all the ingredients, shake well with ice, strain into a chilled cocktail glass and enjoy.  This one is great straight up or on the rocks; garnish with a lime wedge.  Salt the rim only if you like that sort of thing.

Signature Cocktail Recipe: The Traditional Margarita via Oh So Beautiful Paper (7) Signature Cocktail Recipe: The Traditional Margarita via Oh So Beautiful Paper (8)

Here’s what you’ll get: a drink that is sweet but refreshingly tart, citrusy but deeply, richly vegetal from the agave-derived Tequila.

Signature Cocktail Recipe: The Traditional Margarita via Oh So Beautiful Paper (5)

If you want a real Margarita, here’s what to avoid: blenders, sour mix, frozen limeade, and cheap mixto Tequila. Here’s what you absolutely must use: 100% agave Tequila.  Many Americans have horror stories about Tequila and that one night in college, but most of these can be explained by a) drinking too much and b) drinking mixto, which is a headache-inducing mix of as little as 51% agave, sugar, and neutral spirits.  Spend a little more for 100% agave and banish those bad memories forever.

Signature Cocktail Recipe: The Traditional Margarita via Oh So Beautiful Paper (4) Signature Cocktail Recipe: The Traditional Margarita via Oh So Beautiful Paper (3)

Tequila is distilled from the agave plant and, by law, can only be made in the Mexican state of Jalisco (in this, it is like Champagne, Cognac, or Calvados).  There are three basic types of Tequila: blanco or plata (white or silver), aged less than two months; reposado (rested), aged two months to just under a year; and añejo (aged), aged from one to three years or more.  A white or silver Tequila will give you a much fresher, stronger taste of the agave, while an añejo is a much smoother, richer flavor.  I love a good añejo in my Margarita, but this is really up to you.

Signature Cocktail Recipe: The Traditional Margarita via Oh So Beautiful Paper (2) Signature Cocktail Recipe: The Traditional Margarita via Oh So Beautiful Paper (1)

Where did the Margarita come from? There are some stories out there about a Mexican bartender and the daughter of the German ambassador, or an actress allergic to every spirit but Tequila, or… well, or the typical myths that surround the origins of every great classic cocktail. Here’s what I think: the Margarita probably dates back to Prohibition, when Americans desperate for a good drink went south of the border and started ordering cocktails with Tequila for the first time in large numbers. The Margarita closely resembles the venerable Sidecar family of drinks, which match a spirit, a citrus, and an orange liqueur; it also closely resembles the older Tequila Daisy, which pairs Tequila with lime, grenadine, and club soda. Conveniently enough, Margarita is Spanish for daisy.  Hmm….

Photo Credits: Nole Garey for Oh So Beautiful Paper

{happy weekend!}

Happy Friday everyone!  Despite some truly gorgeous spring weather over the last couple of days, I’m actually feeling like I might be coming down with a cold – so I’m going to head out a bit early to rest and recuperate.  I hope you all have fun plans for the weekend!  But in the meantime…

Constellation-Place-Cards-Neither-Snow-Calligraphy

Photo Credit: Tec Petaja, Calligraphy by Neither Snow, Paper Goods by Mr. Boddington’s Studio

…a few links for your weekend!

This week on Oh So Beautiful Paper:

As usual, we have a fun cocktail coming up for you this afternoon, so check back a bit later for the recipe!  I hope you all have a wonderful weekend, and I’ll see you back here on Monday!  xoxo

Pretty Paper in the Office: Push Pins

I always like my spaces tidy, so a bulletin board is an office staple for me.  You can quickly swap out and add to your mood boards as you please.  (Which, if you’re anything like me it, is something you do quite often.)  Who’s to say that the bulletin board itself can’t be as inspiring as what’s pinned to it?  There are so many cute and quirky ways to tack up your eye candy that there might be one just right for your style and your workspace.  I’ve put together a round up of some of the most charming pins, worthy of even the most creative spaces. Julie

Push Pin Round Up

No. 1 Antique gold finished tacks by Ballard Designs; No. 2 See Jane Work push pins from Paper Source; No. 3 Italian push pins from The Curiosity Shoppe; No. 4 Hardwood push pins from The Container Store; No. 5 Fabric covered push pins by Not Sew Strange; No. 6 Numbered push pins from Present & Correct

{images via their respective sources}

DIY Tutorial: Rubber Stamp Floral Wedding Invitations

It’s the ladies of Anti­quaria, back with another cre­ative DIY project for you!  Today they’re sharing a fun tutorial on how to make gorgeous rubber stamp wedding invitations with a floral motif!

We love the versatility and custom look that rubber stamps can give your invitation suite.  This week, we wanted to show how the same stamp designs can lead to two very different wedding invitation suites: one designed for a festive tropical bash, and the other for more traditional, sophisticated affair!  It’s as simple as changing the stamp pad and envelope colors!  Let us show you…

DIY Tutorial: Floral Rubber Stamp Wedding Invitations

Option 1: For the tropical fete… shades of coral, mango, and berry make the floral border.  Lovely pool colored envelopes complement the suite.

DIY Tutorial: Floral Rubber Stamp Wedding Invitations

Option 2: Traditional black and white convey elegance and sophistication.

DIY Tutorial: Floral Rubber Stamp Wedding Invitations

Step 1:  You’ll want to stamp your invitation wording first… it makes things much more simple.  Ink your stamp (we used our classic invitation stamp) thoroughly, and center it over your paper.  Press firmly but moderately, using the handle as your primary pressure point to avoid an uneven print.  Let dry.

DIY Tutorial: Floral Rubber Stamp Wedding Invitations

Step 2: Put a sheet of regular text weight paper underneath your already printed invitation. Using your border stamps, (we used our camellia pattern stampdaisy pattern stamp and small leaves pattern stamp) begin stamping the motifs around the border, making sure not to cover any text.  Go in a clockwise pattern and stamp the images sparsely first… you can always come back in and add more in each circular pass.  It also helps to stamp off of the page, giving the invitation a full bleed effect.  It  would be wise to start with your largest motif and move to the smaller ones to fill in the border.  If you are using multiple colors, be certain to make the overall border balanced in color and design.

DIY Tutorial: Floral Rubber Stamp Wedding Invitations

Step 3: Print your reply card (we used our classic reply card stamp) in the same manner as you did the invitation text.  If you like, you can also add your floral motifs to this card, like in the tropical suite, or keep it simple, as shown above.

DIY Tutorial: Floral Rubber Stamp Wedding Invitations

Step 4: Stamp your return and reply addresses (we used our calligraphy return address stamp) on your envelopes.  You can re-use the stamp long  after your wedding is over… maybe on all those thank you notes!!!

DIY Tutorial: Floral Rubber Stamp Wedding Invitations

Step 5: We’ve chosen to add a black text weight paper liner to the outer envelope.  This is a great way to bring in some additional color to the suite and to create a nice balance.  It’s simple to do as well… you can find envelope liner template kits or pre-cut liners at Paper Source and local craft stores.  If you’re using square envelopes, you can also have your local print shop cut paper down to your envelope specifications.  Then just put a line  of double stick tape or stick glue across the top, slide them into position and press to secure.  Fold at the crease with a bone folder to get a nice, crisp edge.

DIY Tutorial: Floral Rubber Stamp Wedding Invitations

Now all that’s left is to tie the suite together, address them and hand them off to your post office to deliver to your lovely guests!!

Materials:

For the classic invitation suite

Classic Invitation Stamp

Classic Reply Card Stamp

Calligraphy Return Address Stamp

Camellia Pattern Stamp

Daisy Pattern Stamp

Small Leaves Pattern Stamp

Stamp Pad – in Black

Cover Weight Paper, cut to A7 (5″x7″) and 4bar (3″x5″)

A7 Envelope

4bar Envelope

Liner paper in black, cut to size

Double Stick tape

Twine – in black and white

For the tropical invitation suite

Classic Invitation Stamp

Classic Reply Card Stamp

Calligraphy Return Address Stamp

Classic Monogram Stamp

Camellia Pattern Stamp

Daisy Pattern Stamp

Small Leaves Pattern Stamp

Stamp Pad – in Coral, Mango Tango, Magenta and Antique Pewter

Cover Weight Paper, cut to A9 (5.5″x8.5″) and 4bar (3″x5″)

A9 Envelope – in Pool

4bar Envelope – in Pool